Start here- Your menstrual cycle

Understanding what your menstrual cycle is and how it works, is the key to having control over your hormones. Here we understand, what a normal period is. It is only from here that we can then understand how hormone imbalances may be affecting our health.

Overview

A textbook period is 28 days, however it can be normal to have a period anywhere from 27 days to 35 days.  Your period is split into 2 sections of 14 days, with ovulation (egg release) in the middle. Hormones change during these phases to grow the egg and allow it to attach to the uterine wall and allow for pregnancy. It is a beautiful nuance between the brain and reproductive organs that creates these changes. When something is off, everything else alters.

Early Phase

Also known as the follicular phase, this is where your body grows and develops your egg to get ready to be fertilised.  It spans from the first day of bleeding to ovulation. Hormonally oestrogen is accumulates over this phase to help build and develop the follicle into an egg that is ready to be fertilised when the brain perceives it is safe to fall pregant.

Ovulation Phase

This is the ‘New Years Eve, BALL DROP’ moment. Once oestrogen levels hit their peak and the brain perceives it is safe to fall pregnant, ie. no outer stress on your body or reason for your cortisol (stress hormone) levels to raise, the brain will release a hormone called Luteinising Hormone (LH), this signals the release of the egg and triggers progesterone to build.

Late Phase

Here is where your Progesterone dominates. Progesterone is important for with-holding a pregnancy as it helps to develop the cervical mucous. Practically you can notice thicker white discharge around the earlier stages of this phase. When your body detects the egg is not fertilised, oestrogen and progesterone spike (around 5 days before bleeding) and then rapidly drop off, this drop off in both hormones triggers bleeding and the start of your next period. Note: The hormone spike in both of your hormones 5 days before your period has been linked to the PMS signs we can experience… Read on below for a run down on how your hormones can impact the rest of your body.

"

PhD Exercise Physiologist and Nutritionist

Dr. Stacey Sims 

Hormones tell our body what to do. How to eat, sleep and even when to grow. They give us our appetite and sex drive. They help us have babies, They make us happy, sad and giddy in love.

In men, these hormones are pretty stable day in and day out (though they certainly change over a lifetime). In women, however, it’s another story. And that story centres around the menstrual cycle.

Oestrogen Why Do we care?

Oestrogen’s primary role, if you forget everything else is to; Build and grow things! In technical terms it is an anabolic hormone. It does great things for us like; develop our follicles into eggs ready to be fertilised, protects our bones by making them strong and helps to prevent alzheimers. It has also unfortunately been known to feed female cancers because of its ‘growing’ nature, allowing damaged cells to grow and replicate. Oestrogen is sourced from several areas; It can be produced in your body (endogenous)the best kind, from plants (Phyto-oestrogens) and from plastics or non-organic compounds (Xeno-oestrogens). As a general hard and fast rule, endogenous oestrogen and phyto-oestrogens promote good health and xeno-oestrogen’s are like the evil twin, that promotes the negative affects of oestrogen.  Check out these recipes high in naturally occurring phyto-oestrogens. 

Progesterone Why Do we care?

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, conse ctetur adipcing elit off sedllo eiusmod rfty tempore incid dunt ulat labore elret herrty dolore malgna aliqua Uiot enim aled minim sit amet

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Optio, neque qui velit. Magni dolorum quidem ipsam eligendi, totam, facilis laudantium cum accusamus ullam voluptatibus commodi numquam, error, est. Ea, consequatur.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Optio, neque qui velit. Magni dolorum quidem ipsam eligendi, totam, facilis laudantium cum accusamus ullam voluptatibus commodi numquam, error, est. Ea, consequatur.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Optio, neque qui velit. Magni dolorum quidem ipsam eligendi, totam, facilis laudantium cum accusamus ullam voluptatibus commodi numquam, error, est. Ea, consequatur.

What causes bleeding? 

Bleeding occurs when both of your hormones (oestrogen and progesterone) are at low levels 

"

Founder of TSOM

Dr. Anthea

The best person to control your health is you. Arm yourself with knowledge, have the courage to act on that knowledge, and live in your power.